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The opinions expressed by the bloggers and those providing comments are theirs alone, and do not reflect the views and opinions of Preservation Idaho. Preservation Idaho is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the contributing writers.

Submitted by Carmen Morawski on August 8, 2014 - Comments: 0
Although I've lived in Boise for over twenty five years, I'd never been to the V.A. medical Center until a recent Saturday morning. I'd never had a reason to go. I wasn't a patient, and I didn't know anyone who was. Besides, I make a point of steering clear of hospitals and doctors when I can.
Submitted by Dan Everhart on July 13, 2014 - Comments: 0
Some 30 archeologists from around Idaho participated in a June dig under the front porch of the former Surgeon’s Quarters now known as Building 4 at the Boise VA Medical Center.  The decaying front porch, which will be rebuilt to its original design, gave collaborators Preservation Idaho, the University of Idaho, and the Idaho Archaeological Society an opportunity to explore artifacts related to past inhabitants and identify hidden architectural features.
Submitted by Preservation Idaho on April 24, 2014 - Comments: 2
Boise, Idaho – April 22, 2014 – Preservation Idaho is pleased to announce the recipients of the 37th Annual Orchids and Onions Awards. Every year, Preservation Idaho hosts the Orchids and Onions Awards, an awards ceremony designed to celebrate individuals and organizations that have made a positive contribution to historic preservation in Idaho, and in turn to bring awareness to those projects that have shown insensitivity to the state’s cultural history.
Submitted by Preservation Idaho on November 9, 2013 - Comments: 14
An unfortunate fire, perhaps arson, has halted Preservation Idaho's effort to save and rehabilitate two turn of the century homes in Boise's Central Addition. Preservation Idaho has been working behind the scenes to find a supportive buyer for the property. We have also led a number of walking tours of the neighborhood to educate the public on the importance of incorporating historic buildings into the area's future re-development. The 2nd Empire style home at 416 S. 4th St. with its elaborate exterior and interior was an exceptional lose (first picture). Preservation Idaho will attempt to salvage what remains.
Submitted by Preservation Idaho on April 26, 2013 - Comments: 2
Boise, Idaho – April 25, 2013 – Preservation Idaho is pleased to announce the recipients of the 36th Annual Orchids and Onions Awards. Every year, Preservation Idaho hosts the Orchids and Onions Awards, an awards ceremony designed to celebrate individuals and organizations that have made a positive contribution to historic preservation, and in turn to bring awareness to those projects that have shown insensitivity to the state’s cultural history.
Submitted by Preservation Idaho on February 19, 2013 - Comments: 1
Help Preservation Idaho celebrate the landscape and built environment that shaped Boise over the past 150 years by sharing your items from lost buildings. The exhibition, titled Remnants of Boise will display architectural relics from the last 150 years in Boise. Remnants of Boise is brought to you by the Boise City Department of Arts & History on behalf of BOISE 150 and in collaboration with Preservation Idaho.
Submitted by Nancy Foster Renk on October 29, 2012 - Comments: 4
Shoshone Co. courthouse in Wallace, Oct. 1985 If you take the Friday tour to the Silver Valley (The Big Burn and Idaho's Silver Valley, led by Nancy Richardson and Keith Petersen, a 2012 National Preservation Conference Field Session), you'll probably see the Shoshone County Courthouse on Bank Street. It's a handsome Neo-Classical Revival building designed in 1905 by two Spokane architects, Lewis R. Stritesky and Robert C. Sweatt. The walls use concrete blocks made from recycled mine tailings. This the third official courthouse for Shoshone County and Wallace is the third county seat. Yes, there have been a few changes in Shoshone County in more than 150 years.
Submitted by Nancy Foster Renk on October 17, 2012 - Comments: 9
I love railroad trestles. They have enough angles and diagonals to make me think that my 10th grade geometry class may have had more relevance that I realized at the time. Some of the best trestles in Idaho are found on the Camas Prairie Railroad, easily seen from U.S. Highway 95 when driving between Lapwai and Grangeville. And if you take a short detour through Ferdinand along Old Highway 95, you can drive right through Bridge 40, which crosses the road more than 120 feet above the pavement. (Bridge numbers match mile numbers; when there is more than one bridge in a one-mile segment, they are numbered consecutively with decimals, such as Bridge 21.1, 21.2, etc.)
Submitted by Nancy Foster Renk on August 22, 2012 - Comments: 2
Those of us who live in the Idaho Panhandle refer to this area as North Idaho, as if it were a separate state. We live in the Pacific Time Zone, get our news from Spokane, and are more likely to follow Gonzaga basketball than Boise State football. We can drive to the capitals of nearby states more easily, and on better highways, than we can get to Boise. Sandpoint is 323 miles from Helena, 394 miles from Olympia, and 421 miles from Boise. Sometimes we feel worlds apart.
Submitted by Nancy Foster Renk on July 27, 2012 - Comments: 3
It's raining again in North Idaho. After a snowy winter and wet spring, the Pack River is running high. The broken pilings from the old logging railroad bridge near the store are covered with water, something that always happens during a high water year. This is not unusual for North Idaho, however, and other years have been much higher. Old timers will be happy to tell you about the flood of 1948 when water crept up the streets in Sandpoint almost to the courthouse. And that flood paled in comparison with the one in 1894 that washed out many sections of railroad tracks around Lake Pend Oreille and forced the Northern Pacific to ship passengers and freight via steamboat between Ventnor and Clark Fork. The flood that year set the historic high water mark that remains unchallenged.